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Monday, April 30, 2018

ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

California teens are pre-registering in droves. But will they actually vote?
Though the “youth vote” has long been touted as a potential difference maker – only to fizzle out when first-time eligible voters fail to come to the polls – experts say this cycle might be different.
https://www.ocregister.com/2018/04/27/california-teens-are-pre-registering-in-droves-but-will-they-actually-vote/

LOS ANGELES TIMES

DAILY PILOT
Newport Harbor High students and teachers protest dead rats found in classroom building
"No mas ratas! No more rats!" About 150 Newport Harbor High School students and teachers chanted Friday on the sidewalk in front of the campus administration building while holding colorful banners emblazoned with slogans such as "Congrats, we have rats" and "The plague, Part II." The demonstrators said the protest came after months of complaints about a rat infestation at the school's Dodge Hall, where math and world language classes are held.
http://www.latimes.com/socal/daily-pilot/news/tn-dpt-me-newport-harbor-high-rats-20180427-story.html

DAILY PILOT
New principals announced for 4 Ocean View district schools
The Ocean View School District has announced the hiring of four new elementary school principals for the 2018-19 school year: Elaine Burney at College View; Lori Florgan at Golden View; Joy Harris at Harbour View; and Jennifer Landero at Oak View.
http://www.latimes.com/socal/daily-pilot/news/tn-dpt-me-around-town-20180427-story.html

NEW YORK TIMES

Worried About Risky Teenage Behavior? Make School Tougher
A paper in the American Journal of Health Economics suggests a connection: Some of the reduction in risky behavior by teenagers is driven by greater academic demands at school. Between 1993 and 2013, 40 states and the District of Columbia increased graduation requirements: a specified number of courses in each subject necessary for a high school diploma. The increases have been most common in mathematics and science, and may partly explain the growth in college majors in STEM fields. In 1993, states required between two and six math and science courses for high school graduation. By 2014, the range was four to eight.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/30/upshot/worried-about-risky-teenage-behavior-make-school-tougher.html

SI&A CABINET REPORT

LEA Waiver requests jumped in 2017
Confronted with a host of new policies and conditions created by a wholesale restructuring of the school testing and accountability system, local educational agencies submitted 416 waiver applications last year—a 30 percent increase over 2016. Among the common requests was relief from requirements over a testing report deadline; mandates for LEAs to provide summertime instruction for students with disabilities; and state codes that limit where a charter school can be located.
https://k-12daily.org/politics-education/lea-waiver-requests-jumped-in-2017

Helping parents track student absences can boost attendance
Informing parents about not just when their children miss school, but also how often, can reduce absenteeism by 10 percent or more in every grade, according to new research. Researchers Todd Rogers from the Harvard Kennedy School and Avi Feller of the University of California, Berkeley found that simply mailing out postcards to parents in a timely manner when their kids miss school–and including the total number of days they had missed–helped boost attendance in the School District of Philadelphia.
https://k-12daily.org/human-resources/helping-parents-track-student-absences-can-boost-attendance

KPCC

28,000 LA preschoolers are learning how to be better humans
This school year, all 86 of the early childhood centers in the district started using a program called Sanford Harmony, which provides structured activities to help kids develop socially and emotionally. That means more than 28,000 kids in preschool and transitional kindergarten are getting hand-on training in how to build friendships, be empathetic and self-aware starting at the age of four.
https://www.scpr.org/news/2018/04/30/82494/28-000-la-preschoolers-are-learning-how-to-be-bett/

OCDE NEWSROOM

Fountain Valley High wins inaugural Orange County High School Esports League crown
The two teams made up of orcs, dragons, vikings, serpents and other virtual characters battled in front of a screaming crowd Saturday for the chance to win the first-ever Orange County High School Esports League championship. After nearly two hours of intense battles in the online strategy game League of Legends, the team from Fountain Valley High School defeated the La Quinta High team from Westminster to clinch the crown at the Esports Arena in downtown Santa Ana.
http://newsroom.ocde.us/fountain-valley-high-wins-inaugural-orange-county-high-school-esports-league-crown/

OCDE’s Inside the Outdoors makes the most out of Earth Month with 27 community events
You probably know that April 22 is annually observed as Earth Day. But did you know the entire month of April is celebrated as Earth Month? OCDE’s Inside the Outdoors program is certainly aware, and they’ve been making the most of it. In addition to coordinating hands-on science lessons for 10,000 students through field trips and its Traveling Scientist program, Inside the Outdoors has hosted 27 community events in April alone, promoting environmental education and stewardship.
http://newsroom.ocde.us/12566-2/

NPR

What 'A Nation At Risk' Got Wrong, And Right, About U.S. Schools
Very few government reports have had the staying power of "A Nation At Risk," which appeared 35 years ago this month and stoked widespread concerns about the quality of American schools. The report's narrative of failing schools — students being out-competed internationally and declining educational standards — persists, and has become an entrenched part of the debate over education in the U.S.
https://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2018/04/29/604986823/what-a-nation-at-risk-got-wrong-and-right-about-u-s-schools


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