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Monday, June 26, 2017

ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

CHOC annual prom for teens with cancer ‘celebrates patients and their journey’
Children’s Hospital of Orange County celebrated its 16th annual oncology prom with an “Alice in Wonderland” theme for about 250 cancer patients and guests on Saturday night, June 24. The event provides a night of normalcy for teens who may have had to skip their high school proms because they were in the hospital or have weakened immune systems.
http://www.ocregister.com/2017/06/25/teens-with-cancer-attend-16th-annual-hospital-prom-at-choc/

DAILY NEWS LOS ANGELES

LAUSD sets goal of ‘biliteracy for all’ by graduation
Among the many actions the Los Angeles Unified School District board took last week – including adopting a budget for the upcoming fiscal year – members unanimously agreed on a goal for students entering kindergarten in the 2018-19 school year: biliteracy for all by the time they graduate. The idea is that all students entering kindergarten in the district in 2018-19 will graduate with the ability to read and write in a second language in addition to the language they speak at home.
http://www.dailynews.com/social-affairs/20170625/lausd-sets-goal-of-biliteracy-for-all-by-graduation

WASHINGTON POST

School voucher recipients first lose academic ground, later catch up to peers, studies find
Students who received publicly funded vouchers in Louisiana and Indiana appeared to lose significant academic ground in the first two years after switching to private school and then catch up to their public-school counterparts in subsequent years, according to two new studies made public Monday. The new studies do not show that vouchers led to significantly stronger math and reading performance overall, even as President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos promise to pour billions into expanding vouchers nationwide.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/2017/06/26/d99f94b8-5a0f-11e7-a9f6-7c3296387341_story.html

EDSOURCE

In California push to help students with dyslexia, LA schools take a first step
The Los Angeles Unified school board jumped ahead of a new state law last week and instructed the school district to immediately create a plan to train teachers on the leading learning disability in California: a reading impairment known as dyslexia.
https://edsource.org/2017/in-california-push-to-help-students-with-dyslexia-la-schools-take-a-first-step/583701

SI&A CABINET REPORT

Smarter Balanced comes up short on interim exams
Even as schools reached a milestone this month in transitioning to new statewide assessments, concerns over the testing program’s inability to provide useable feedback from interim exams has provoked legislative intervention. After adopting new curriculum standards in 2012, schools moved to a computer-based testing system two years later. Last week, the state reported an estimated 3.2 million students participated in the program this spring out of a possible 3.3 million.
https://www.cabinetreport.com/curriculum-instruction/smarter-balanced-comes-up-short-on-interim-exams

KPCC

Early childhood educators get schooled in working with 'exceptional' kids
When federal data in 2014 revealed that thousands of students were being suspended in preschool, officials at Los Angeles Universal Preschool were shocked. In response, they created a program for educators who work with the students at greatest risk for suspension.
http://www.scpr.org/news/2017/06/23/73185/early-childhood-educators-get-schooled-in-working/

OCDE NEWSROOM

Summer food programs in OC ensure children won’t go hungry when schools are closed
More than 250,000 students throughout the county rely on free or reduced-price meals provided by their schools. But what happens when OC campuses close for the summer? Dareen Khatib, manager of OCDE’s Nutrition and Wellness Services team, tells us there are a number of summer food programs that help bridge the gap, offering free, nutritious meals for children and teens up to age 18.
http://newsroom.ocde.us/summer-food-programs-ensure-children-wont-go-hungry-when-schools-are-closed/

NPR

Supreme Court Rules Religious School Can Use Taxpayer Funds For Playground
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that taxpayer-funded grants for playgrounds available to nonprofits under a state program could not be denied to a school run by a church. "The consequence is, in all likelihood, a few extra scraped knees. But the exclusion of Trinity Lutheran from a public benefit for which it is otherwise qualified, solely because it is a church, is odious to our Constitution all the same, and cannot stand," Justice John Roberts wrote for the majority.
http://www.npr.org/2017/06/26/534084013/supreme-court-rules-religious-school-can-use-taxpayer-funds-for-playground


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